Planning Matters When Giants Fall

S. Schuchart

Summary Bullets:

• The most important companies of today may not be around tomorrow

• Planning for alternatives in technology purchasing/direction insulates from vendor instability

The recent travails of Twitter and its new owner have been the subject of considerable news reports and analysis. Twitter has been a fixture of social media for over a decade, and its fate is yet to be determined. The larger effect of Twitter’s current trials on the technology industry has been one of shock. Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, AWS, Google, Apple, Microsoft, and other “big tech” stalwarts have a feeling of permanence, a sense that these companies are forever. No member of IT staff or technologist can really go a day without encountering at least one of these firms. Their storied market prominence, technological achievements, and reputations all add to the feeling that these companies will be around and important forever. Continue reading “Planning Matters When Giants Fall”

The End Shape of Things

S. Schuchart

Summary Bullets:

• Evolutionary predictions are relatively easy; revolutionary predictions for cataclysmic, market-changing events are nearly impossible to predict.

• Skepticism, value-focus, and clear identification of what is evolutionary, even when it’s dressed up as revolutionary, is key to effective technology decision-making.

Historically, humanity’s ability to see the end shape of things is spectacularly bad. Smart, monied people such as Thomas Watson, the storied CEO of IBM, in 1943 said there would be a world market for maybe five computers. The inventor of Ethernet, Robert Metcalfe, predicted that the internet itself would “supernova” and collapse in 1996. Those are egregious examples of being spectacularly wrong, but it makes sense to look at the perspective of those predictions in the light of the conditions and observations they could make at the time.

Continue reading “The End Shape of Things”

Fly by Wire

S. Schuchart

Summary Bullets:

• Wireless, especially 5G and WiFi6/6E, are so popular, the wired seems old-fashioned.

• Use the right technology for the application and don’t discount a wired connection.

We all swim in a world of radio frequencies delivering us music, television, data, the beloved voices of our friends and family, or the dreaded drone of telemarketers. Both 5G and WiFi 6E are the hot topic in enterprise wireless spaces, touted for everything from stadium connectivity to mass IoT. The sheer engineering of these technologies is awesome to behold, and the tricks radio-frequency engineers have learned over the years to coax more and more performance out of allocated spectrum is truly wonderous to behold. It’s reached the point where the very idea of using actual wiring – be it copper or optical fiber – seems quaintly old-fashioned outside of data center environments.

Continue reading “Fly by Wire”

Quantum Error Correction Will Supercharge the Quantum Computing Market

S. Schuchart

Summary Bullets:

• Quantum error correction is a significant driver for quantum computing research and the unending quest for quantum supremacy

• The quantum computing market will explode if quantum error correction allows for markedly more stable qubits

As 2022 continues its exorable march towards 2023, the developments in the quantum computing market continue at a dizzying pace. Its particularly remarkable considering that quantum supremacy is still elusive. Quantum supremacy, also sometimes called quantum advantage, is when a quantum computer can solve problems faster than its classical computing counterparts. Without quantum supremacy, the commercial uses and long term prospects of quantum computing evaporate like water droplets in a hot skillet. Continue reading “Quantum Error Correction Will Supercharge the Quantum Computing Market”

Executive Departure Adds More Uncertainty to Broadcom’s VMware Acquisition

S. Schuchart

Summary Bullets:

  • Tom Krause is leaving Broadcom to become CEO of Citrix-Tibco, increasing tensions around the planned acquisition of VMware.
  • Broadcom CEO Hock Tan is taking over the Broadcom Software division, but there may be a chance that VMware’s leadership team could run the division if the acquisition closes.

The latest chapter in the saga of Broadcom’s quest to buy VMware sees the architect and face of the deal, Broadcom Software President Tom Krause, leaving Broadcom to become CEO of Citrix-Tibco. For fans following along at home, Citrix was purchased by private equity firms Vista Equity Partners and Elliott Investment Management that plan to merge Citrix with Tibco. The merger of those two is much like the purchase of VMware by Broadcom – a move with very few synergies that leaves everyone scratching their heads and wondering why. It seems as if the thought process is that any software company can be merged with any other… because they are all software, right?

Continue reading “Executive Departure Adds More Uncertainty to Broadcom’s VMware Acquisition”

IBM’s Quantum Roadmap for 2025 Brings Practicality and Excitement

S. Schuchart

Summary Bullets:    

  • IBM’s roadmap for quantum computing leans heavily into software/development as the interface to make solving problems on quantum computers as easy as it is on classical systems.
  • IBM’s introduction of its modular quantum computing plan will allow, in the long term, parallelization of quantum computing, essentially creating larger quantum CPUs out of several smaller ones.

As it has been for the last several years, the quantum computing market is again boiling with a great deal of vim and vigor.  In May 2022, IBM made an announcement that it is expanding its roadmap for quantum computing, particularly at a large scale with a focus on realistic problems. IBM’s very near-term, previously disclosed roadmap includes the 433-qubit processor named IBM Osprey, which the company expects to make available later this year. In 2023, IBM intends to introduce IBM Condor, a quantum CPU that reaches 1,000+ cubits.

Continue reading “IBM’s Quantum Roadmap for 2025 Brings Practicality and Excitement”

Employee Monitoring Has Unintended Consequences

S. Schuchart

Summary Bullets:

  • Productivity monitoring software causes more unintentional harm than good.
  • Companies that implement productivity monitoring software will suffer from more turnover and have a much more difficult time in hiring.

While often talked about separately, the Great Resignation and work from home (WFH) are inextricably linked.  Both are pandemic-born and have propagated a number of technological trends, including greater focus on security, collaboration, and productivity. But technology is not always the solution. In this case, the proliferation of monitoring software and the relative enthusiasm for it can and will backfire spectacularly. Continue reading “Employee Monitoring Has Unintended Consequences”

Follow the Hardware to Gauge Enterprise Metaverse Adoption

Summary Bullets:

S. Schuchart

• Headset hardware, especially size and weight, is the greatest inhibitor of metaverse plans coming to large scale fruition

• The speed and commitment of headset hardware vendors is an indicator of metaverse acceleration

Hype over the metaverse may be subsiding slightly as world events overtake everyone’s available attention, but one of the biggest inhibitors to the fruition of the metaverse is headset hardware. AR or VR glasses are available, but it is reasonable to look at the large, clunky, and tethered-box offerings that dominate the market as the current equivalent of acoustic modem adapters or six-pound “mobile” phones.

Continue reading “Follow the Hardware to Gauge Enterprise Metaverse Adoption”

Cisco and Private 5G – Clarification

Summary Bullets:

S. Schuchart

• Cisco’s Private 5G solution will be offered through its service provider partners

• Enterprises need the integration of private 5G solutions with their existing network management, identity, and policy tools

In early February, Cisco made an announcement of some new Wi-Fi 6E access points, new Catalyst switches, and lastly the new Cisco Private 5G offering, and I wrote a report for our clients about it. However, there was a mistake on my part. I posited that Cisco was challenging the service providers and offering the product directly to customers. The truth is that Cisco is offering its new Cisco Private 5G offering with service provider partners, not against them. Cisco was kind enough to point out my mistake and provided me with more details on their go to market strategy for Cisco Private 5G. For that mistake, I apologize to Cisco. However, it does bring up the opportunity to talk a little bit more about why the Cisco Private 5G offering is important to enterprises, regardless of where it was sourced.

Continue reading “Cisco and Private 5G – Clarification”

The Myths of the Metaverse  

S. Schuchart

Summary Bullets:

  • The metaverse should be divided into the consumer metaverse (CMV) and enterprise metaverse (EMV) segments for discussion.
  • Metaverse proponents must get past over-enthusiastic, get-rich-quick thinking and provide real value, particularly in the EMV segment.

The inaugural report on the metaverse from the enterprise technology group at GlobalData is now available to subscribers.  Discussion centers on not only the origins of the term ‘metaverse,’ but also hype, pitfalls, value, and the need to divide the market, at least at a high level.  GlobalData subscribers can read it here.

The metaverse can be logically divided into two macro parts: the CMV and the EMV.  At the time of this writing, momentum is coming from the CMV, where companies like Meta Platforms (Facebook) are driving interest, money, and attention.  The vast majority of the hardware is also coming from the CMV, at least for now.  This is one of those rare occasions when the technology flows up into the enterprise from the consumer space. Continue reading “The Myths of the Metaverse  “